Definition

An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide. Warfarin is a rodenticide used in the home, outdoors, in food service establishments, near fruit trees, in storage buildings, sewers and other places where rodents may be a problem. This white, odorless, tasteless compound, an anti-coagulant, causes bleeding and blood-thinning. [HMDB]

Description

Warfarin is an anticoagulant drug normally used to prevent blood clot formation as well as migration. Although originally marketed as a pesticide (d-Con, Rodex, among others), Warfarin has since become the most frequently prescribed oral anticoagulant in North America. Warfarin has several properties that should be noted when used medicinally, including its ability to cross the placental barrier during pregnancy which can result in fetal bleeding, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death. Additional adverse effects such as necrosis, purple toe syndrome, osteoporosis, valve and artery calcification, and drug interactions have also been documented with warfarin use. Warfarin does not actually affect blood viscosity, rather, it inhibits vitamin-k dependent synthesis of biologically active forms of various clotting factors in addition to several regulatory factors.

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Warfarin Interacts with Diseases

Warfarin Interacts with Genes