Definition

Carrier of aroma of butter, vinegar, coffee, and other foods. Constit. of butter; formed during fermentation. A common constit. of plant oils, prod. of breakdown of carbohydrates. Flavouring additive used in food industry. Also present in apple, orange, plum, okra, walnut, Bourbon vanilla, clary sage, soybean, coffee, honey, rose wine, port wine, cocoa and scallop Beer sometimes undergoes a diacetyl rest, in which its temperature is raised slightly for two or three days after fermentation is complete, to allow the yeast to absorb the diacetyl it produced earlier in the fermentation cycle. The makers of some wines, such as chardonnay, deliberately promote the production of diacetyl because of the feel and flavor it imparts. It is present in many California chardonnays known as 'Butter Bombs,' although there is a growing trend back toward the more traditional French styles.[citation needed]; Diacetyl (IUPAC systematic name: butanedione or 2,3-butanedione) is a natural byproduct of fermentation. It is a vicinal diketone (two C=O groups, side-by-side) with the molecular formula C4H6O2. Diacetyl occurs naturally in alcoholic beverages and is added to some foods to impart a buttery flavor.; Diacetyl is a natural by-product of secondary or malolactic fermentation. It is a vicinal diketone (two C=O groups, side-by-side) with the molecular formula C4H6O2.; Carrier of aroma of butter, vinegar, coffee, and other foods.; Beer sometimes undergoes a diacetyl rest, which entails waiting two or three days after fermentation is complete, to allow the yeast to absorb the diacetyl it produced earlier in the fermentation cycle. The makers of some wines, such as chardonnay, deliberately promote the production of diacetyl because of the feel and flavors it imparts.

Description

Diacetyl is a natural by-product of secondary or malolactic fermentation. It is a vicinal diketone (two C=O groups, side-by-side) with the molecular formula C4H6O2. Carrier of aroma of butter, vinegar, coffee, and other foods. Beer sometimes undergoes a diacetyl rest, which entails waiting two or three days after fermentation is complete, to allow the yeast to absorb the diacetyl it produced earlier in the fermentation cycle. The makers of some wines, such as chardonnay, deliberately promote the production of diacetyl because of the feel and flavors it imparts.

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